Movies

Australian Exclusive: Diane Lane on Alec Baldwin, Paris Can Wait and her Hollywood legacy

In her only Australian interview, we discover a delicious new side to the Hollywood siren.

By Chloe Lal
Diane Lane

From the The Outsiders, Under the Tuscan Sun to Man of Steel... Diane Lane is a woman that encapsulates the essence of Hollywood.

Having starred in over 45 films, the 52-year-old has really done it all.

Now the beloved starlet is in Eleanor Coppola's, (who, at 81 is making her fictional film debut), Paris Can Wait, alongside Alec Baldwin and Arnaud Viard.

Now To Love exclusively chatted to the Tinseltown legend.

Check out the film's trailer below... Interview continues!

What attracted you to Eleanor’s film and to the role of Anne?
I wanted to be in a story that reminds people that there are still delightful things to enjoy in the world and we need not allow ourselves to be defined by our past.

I knew it would be an enjoyable experience selfishly, but more importantly one to share as a message that pleasure has its place in life, maybe even as a portal to question our self-imposed status quo.

And if you can't get away to the locale the film takes place in, then by golly you can have a 90-minute fantasy that is a relief from the news.

Diane is a breath of fresh air in *Paris Can Wait*
Diane is a breath of fresh air in Paris Can Wait

The last time you worked with Alec was back in 1995 in A Streetcar Named Desire. More than twenty years later, how has your working relationship changed?
Alec has become much more appreciated for his indelible gift of wryly representing the 'less enlightened male' (Stanley Kowalski was my other intimate experience of Alec professionally).

Who knew way back in the summer of 2015 when we filmed Paris Can Wait that he would secure his current iconic status, in addition to his already enviable career achievements?

I am so happy to have the memories of Alec and his daughter and his newer family members enjoying the experience of being in France together for the filming.

Alec and Diane have known each other for over two decades.
Alec and Diane have known each other for over two decades.

The film is truly a food odyssey, is food a big part of your life?
Funny enough I don't count myself as a bonafide foodie, but I have been blessed to appreciate food in its most natural state.

Food that is not anonymously pre-manufactured, packaged and trucked to the place where it's sold, but rather prepared by caring policies that value the integrity of the ingredients.

You’ve been in so many classics, what’s one film that has stayed with you?
My father's favourite role I ever played [up until he died in 2002] was the Lonesome Dove miniseries, and my role as Lorie. So, in his honor I agree with him.

Eleanor found Diane to be an absolute "delight" to film.
Eleanor found Diane to be an absolute "delight" to film.

You and your daughter have done incredible work for the charity Heifer International. After working with Eleanor Coppola, a highly celebrated documentary-maker, do you think, together, you'd create something based on your charity work?
As a mother it was a gift to watch my daughter witness the world from many perspectives.

As a young adult she is now witnessing the many hurdles to justice, equality and reliable access to safe food and healthy water; healthcare and dignity are global concerns that have local implications.

Diane with her daughter, Eleanor Lambert.
Diane with her daughter, Eleanor Lambert.

And finally, the world is currently going Justice League crazy… What can Superman's mum Martha Kent tell us about the next chapter?
Martha Kent was always a very human source of inspiration in the films. I am happy to report that she remains so.

Paris can Wait is currently in Australian cinemas nationally