British Royal Family

The Queen and Sir David Attenborough have teamed up to save the world and THIS is why we're here for it

They're waging one of the most important kind of wars.

By Ellie McDonald
If you've ever read anything we've written (for argument's sake, let's assume/hope you have), you'd know that we can't get enough of Queen Elizabeth II.
And there's nothing quite like The Queen, y'know, at the age of 91, going ahead and pledging to do her part to save the world.
That's right, Her Majesty has teamed up with none other than the wildlife warrior himself, Sir David Attenborough, to declare a war on plastic.
The Queen has been a longtime fan of Attenborough's work.
Both 91, this pair continue to fight the good fight for the environment.
Following the release of Attenborough's documentary Blue Planet, Buckingham Palace released a statement outlining The Queen's new waste plans that would see plastic straws and bottles banned from the Royal estates.
And, according to The Telegraph, internal caters at Windsor Castle, the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh, as well as Buckingham Palace, will now only be allowed to use china plates, glasses and recyclable paper cups.
"Across the organisation, the Royal Household is committed to reducing its environmental impact," a spokesman for Buckingham Palace stated.
"As part of that, we have taken a number of practical steps to cut back on the use of plastics. At all levels, there's a strong desire to tackle this issue."
The Queen and Attenborough discussing all things environment and the Commonwealth.
'Keep calm and carry on' just won't cut it when it comes to talking about Attenborough's passion for conservation.
As reported by the ABC, a 2010 study highlighted the devastating impact plastic is having on Australian environments. Indeed, an analysis of waters surrounding Oz uncovered that there were roughly 4,000 microplastic fragments per square square kilometre.
This is a shocking statistic considering that between 5,000 and 15,000 sea turtles are tangled in plastic and fishing gear that washes ashore in northern Australia alone.