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The Voice

EXCLUSIVE: The heartbreaking reason The Voice star Jordan Tavita wants to shine a light on mental health

''We’re losing a lot of brothers and sisters in our younger generation.''

By Laura Masia
Standing on The Voice Australia stage was a surreal experience for Jordan Tavita. As the lights shone down and the music began, it was hard to believe it was the first time the 23-year-old had performed in front of an audience.
But for Jordan, who has struggled with confidence all his life, seeing all four judges turn their chairs when they heard his voice brought tears to his eyes.
"It was exhilarating," he tells TV WEEK. "Rita [Ora] and Jess [Mauboy] were the first to turn around. To watch Rita's hands shoot up in the air confirmed that maybe I do sound OK."
But for Jordan, who has struggled with confidence, seeing all four judges turn their chairs brought tears to his eyes. (Image: Seven)
This week, if Jordan wants to hold on to his coveted spot on Team Guy he has to go up against powerhouse performer Celestial Utai in the upcoming Battle Rounds – and that's no easy feat.
"Going up against Celestial is nerve-racking – she's incredible," he admits.
"But I hope Guy [Sebastian] thinks I'm up to the challenge. And I hope I'll be able to overcome my fears and trust my gift."
For Jordan, the experience of working closely with Guy has been life-changing, but not just for his music.
He has to go up against powerhouse performer Celestial Utai in the upcoming Battle Rounds. (Image: Seven)
"Guy is amazing and incredibly passionate," he says.
"He's tough, but in the best way. He brings out the best in me and Celestial too. He doesn't just look after you, but your mental wellbeing as well."
Coming on the show, Jordan hopes to raise awareness for mental health issues, especially in his Polynesian community.
"I've had my own mental health journey, especially with trying to gain confidence, and it's important to bring these issues into the light – especially within our community," he shares.
"We're losing a lot of brothers and sisters in our younger generation. It's really sad. I want people to be aware and re-educate themselves about mental health, because it's serious."
While Jordan has had his struggles, he's proud of how far he's come thanks to the support of his family.
"I'm confident in myself, especially now, and I know it's OK to not be OK. It's OK to talk about it – and if you want to cry, cry!"

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