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Why Brooke Axtell was the real winner at the Grammys

Katy Perry invited activist Brooke Axtell to share her story on the Grammys stage.

Domestic activist Brooke Axtell.
The real winner at the 2015 Grammys was Brooke Axtell. No, she’s not a singer. She’s a strong, determined domestic violence survivor who performed with Katy Perry.
Speaking at the 57th annual awards ceremony in Los Angeles, Ms Axtell recalled the time she fell in love with "a handsome, charismatic man."
"I was stunned when he began to abuse me. I believed my compassion could restore him," Ms Axtell said. "My empathy was used against me. I was ashamed to be in this position. When he threatened to kill me, I knew I had to escape.” She sought help at a local domestic violence centre.
"This conversation saved my life," she said. "Authentic love does not devalue another human being. If you are in a relationship with somebody who does not honour and respect thou ... please reach out for help. You are valuable, beautiful, loved."
Katy Perry during her performance.
Her speech was terrific, and backed up by President Barack Obama, who made a (televised) appearance saying he wanted to see a society where "violence isn't tolerated, and where survivors are supported." In the hours since Axtell has been praised on social media.
Though some attendees haven’t received as much praise on the interwebs. Aussie singer Sia Furler, for example. She doesn't want to be famous, so she turned up at the 57th annual Grammy Awards with a mop on her head.
You couldn't see her face, and she likes it that way.
Sia was born in Adelaide, and educated at Adelaide High, and although she's been writing and performing all her life, things have gone crazy lately.
Her latest album, 1000 Forms of Fear debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard charts last July. The first single, Chandelier, was a smash hit.
With massive success comes massive fame, and Sia isn't comfortable in the spotlight. She didn't star in her own video for Chandelier. She rarely appears in public and, when she does, its either with her back to the camera, or with a paper bag on her head.
"I don't want to be famous. All my friends that I write pop songs for are super famous, and it really f*&^d them up," Sia said, during one interview, "and, like, being hunted, paparazzi-style, doesn’t appeal to me."
Sia was nominated for four Grammys and some wondered if she'd show up. She did but under the mop. Twitter had a field day: she be Sia, but you can't Sia. Get it?
Trouble is, the mop shed. Sia had to have staff following her around with pet rollers, picking up the loose strands off the rest of her outfit. She also had to be walked into the ceremony like a blind person. She couldn't see anything. So in terms of attracting no attention, it kind of backfired.
On the other hand, she didn't win anything, losing out in two categories to Pharrell, who was Happy.
Sia and Iggy Azalea arrive on the red carpet.
There were two other Australians in the running: Izzy Azalea, the white rapper, who has been thumbing her nose at those who say white chicks can't rap; and Keith Urban, who was there with Our Nicole (who debuted long legs and a short bob.) Both missed out.
Madonna turned up a little bit matador, a little bit dominatrix, and flashed her bum, which is kind of cool, given she's nearly 60. Go Madge.
Pharrell came out dressed as a bellhop, with yellow shoes. He performed Happy but in a kind of unhappy way.
There was a special appearance by Barry Gibb, who collected a lifetime achievement award for the Bee Gees.
Ed Sheeran's a weird one: he's got the most extraordinarily lovely songs and terrible red hair that he grows all over his face, down the sides of his head, under his nose, wherever he can fit that red hair, he'd got it growing.
Fans don't seem to mind.
Katy Perry dyed her hair purple. Everyone's doing it.
Kanye performed for the first time in six years. He's been nominated 57 times. That is the actual number of times he has been nominated, not an exaggeration. His current hit, if you can believe this, is a collaboration with Paul McCartney. That's right. He looked to be wearing a Kmart tracksuit, with elastic at wrists and ankles.
For his performance, he stepped in and out of a circle of light. The lyrics are something like: 'No goodbyes, no goodbyes, just hello' which was eerily like a Beatles song, not that there's anything wrong with recycling in music. As Bob Dylan might say, it's just extending the line.
Best moment: Prince. Always, Prince.

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