Destinations

7 of the most Insta-worthy Aussie swim spots

Take your selfie game to the next level with these stunning coastal gems!

Wattamolla Beach

This family-friendly hotspot, within easy striking distance of Sydney, must be human-built.

Nothing else can explain the absurd combination of so many epic swimming elements and picture perfect scenery in one location. A 10-metre waterfall cascades into a deep lagoon which in one direction stretches into tranquil native bush; in the other, it dead-ends at a white-sand beach. Follow the sand to a calm bay where the water is impossibly clear and even on the hottest, busiest day you feel like the only person here.

If we hadn't seen it all for ourselves, we wouldn't believe it was real.

TOP TIP: Bring along snags for the on-site BBQs or kofte if you're feeling classy.

Follow the sand to a calm bay where the water is impossibly clear and even on the hottest, busiest day you feel like the only person here. *(Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)*
Follow the sand to a calm bay where the water is impossibly clear and even on the hottest, busiest day you feel like the only person here. (Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)
Nothing else can explain the absurd combination of so many epic swimming elements and picture perfect scenery in one location. *(Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)*
Nothing else can explain the absurd combination of so many epic swimming elements and picture perfect scenery in one location. (Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)

Turpins Falls

On a hot summer's day, country Victoria can feel particularly landlocked – no wind, no water, no coastline to be found in any direction.

So Turpin Falls in Langley is a welcome relief for many locals, families and day trippers from Melbourne, as one of only a few places to swim.

Although busy, crowds are always a sign of a good thing and Turpins Falls has plenty of redeeming features.

The water is blissfully cool on a hot summer's day and a lively scene of swimmers splash around, chatting in the shallows or floating in the deeper water.

It really is a rich, particularly Australian setting and one to relish in warmer months.

TOP TIP: Be sure to bring some thongs to wear into the water, over rocks and the sludgy bottom.

Story continues...

The water is blissfully cool on a hot summer's day and a lively scene of swimmers splashing around, chatting in the shallows or floating in the deeper water. *(Source: Kate Berry)*
The water is blissfully cool on a hot summer's day and a lively scene of swimmers splashing around, chatting in the shallows or floating in the deeper water. (Source: Kate Berry)
It really is a rich, particularly Australian setting and one to relish in warmer months.*(Source: Kate Berry)*
It really is a rich, particularly Australian setting and one to relish in warmer months.(Source: Kate Berry)

Childers Cove

Despite its location off a well-worn highway, Childers Cove is the kind of place you will only hear about from a local.

A few kilometres down Childers Cove Road on the Victorian coastline, you are slapped with arresting scenes of towering limestone stacks and secret bays.Farmland meets the ocean here on this notoriously wild coastline, where dairy country of rolling green pastures sits high upon steep cliffs that look out over the Southern Ocean – these are truly head-turning, car-swerving landscapes.

Childers Cove is the third bay along this road, after Murnanes and Sandy, and the most protected of the three making it the perfect spot for beach picnic.

TOP TIP: Visit during low to mid-tide, as at high tide the water washes right up over the beach, so there's nowhere to sit.

A few kilometres down Childers Cove Road on the Victorian coastline, you are slapped with arresting scenes of towering limestone stacks and secret bays. *(Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)*
A few kilometres down Childers Cove Road on the Victorian coastline, you are slapped with arresting scenes of towering limestone stacks and secret bays. (Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)

El Questro Gorge

This working cattle station-cum-wilderness resort is at the top of most people's WA travel recommendations and it certainly does not disappoint.

A swimming adventure that unfolds over many hours of discovery, El Questro Gorge presents a generous sample of the Kimberley in one compact package.

A 40-minute walk from the trailhead takes you to Halfway Pool and from there it's just informal scrambling and rock-hopping until you reach MacMicking Pool, where a delicate waterfall drops into a cave-like swimming hole.

If you're not in a rush, you can have El Questro Gorge all to yourself and spend your days climbing and exploring.

TOP TIP: A waterproof bag for your things is a must bring, as you'll have to swim through Halfway Pool to continue upstream.

This working cattle station-cum-wilderness resort is at the top of most people's WA travel recommendations and it certainly does not disappoint. *(Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)*
This working cattle station-cum-wilderness resort is at the top of most people's WA travel recommendations and it certainly does not disappoint. (Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)

Whitehaven Beach

You've seen it on postcards, in magazines and Instagram feeds. But you haven't really seen Whitehaven Beach unless you've visited, taken a picture and captured it for your own social media audience! Seriously though, this place is off the hook, and we know why people flock here like seagulls to hot chips.

Every day the tides around the Whitsundays change, and every day the sand moves. This means that every day the photos taken here will show slightly different swirls of blues, greens and whites.

And though it's hard to imagine that you'll be so blown away by a place you've seen a thousand pictures of, rest assured, you will.

TOP TIP: The most common way to access this incredible place is a day trip via boat but the best way to experience Whitehaven is to camp on Whitsunday Island for a few days.

This place is off the hook, and we know why people flock here like seagulls to hot chips. *(Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)*
This place is off the hook, and we know why people flock here like seagulls to hot chips. (Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)
Every day the tides around the Whitsundays change, and every day the sand moves. *(Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)*
Every day the tides around the Whitsundays change, and every day the sand moves. (Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)

Second Valley

This is the place that really cemented South Australia as the cliff-jumping capital of the country but you don't have to jump to appreciate Second Valley.

On a windless day the ocean appears to be a glassy lagoon beneath black cliffs.

Perfect for any type of swimmer. White-sand patches shift around this little bay and there's good snorkelling off the rocks.

Take the well-worn path to the main swimming hole where the reveal is priceless – expansive coastal views and exquisitely clear water beckons. Or simply sit on the rocks and people-watch.

This is a world-class place, however, jumpers be very careful. We don't want to read about you in the newspaper.TOP TIP: Around the rocky shoreline of this peninsula you may be lucky enough to sight the mysterious leafy seadragon, which looks more like a colourful piece of seaweed or coral than marine life.

Take the well-worn path to the main swimming hole where the reveal is priceless – expansive coastal views and exquisitely clear water beckons. *(Source: Jackson Groves)*
Take the well-worn path to the main swimming hole where the reveal is priceless – expansive coastal views and exquisitely clear water beckons. (Source: Jackson Groves)

Turquoise Bay

The Ningaloo Reef is the best reef in Australia. Wait, the world. At various times of the year, the water swarms with turtles, tropical fish, manta rays, humpback whales and the elusive whale shark.

Walk to Turquoise Bay's south end to jump in, and float back over shallow lagoons formed by the reef, colourful coral and more than 500 species of fish.

Camping is the best way to access the area, with around 15 camp sites shared with the locals – kangaroos like the beach too. TOP TIP: Book your camp site online before you get there – there's no phone reception as soon as you leave Exmouth.

Walk to Turquoise Bay's south end to jump in, and float back over shallow lagoons formed by the reef, colourful coral and more than 500 species of fish. *(Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)*
Walk to Turquoise Bay's south end to jump in, and float back over shallow lagoons formed by the reef, colourful coral and more than 500 species of fish. (Source: Dillon Seitchik-Reardon)
**This is an edited extract from *Places We Swim* by Caroline Clements and Dillon Seitchik-Reardon (Hardie Grant Travel, $39.99). Available in stores nationally now.**
This is an edited extract from Places We Swim by Caroline Clements and Dillon Seitchik-Reardon (Hardie Grant Travel, $39.99). Available in stores nationally now.

read more from