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British Royal Family

Unusual gifts given to Prince George and Princess Charlotte

What to get a royal baby who wants for nothing? Well How about a possum-skin cloak or a Samurai painting or a miniature sized academic gown for a start?

What to get a royal baby who wants for nothing? Well How about a possum-skin cloak or a Samurai painting or a miniature sized academic gown for a start?
Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge’s children Prince George and Princess Charlotte have been gifted some strange gifts during their short little lives and thankfully for us the palace keeps a record of all of them.
When Prince William visited Japan in February 2015 he was gifted with many presents for his son including a Samurai painting and two Kendama games, which is similar to the cup-and-ball game.
The University of St Andrews, where Prince William and his wife Kate both attended, planted the seed to grow its royal alumni by giving little George a tiny graduation gown in 2014.
On his visit to New Zealand last year sports mad Prince Harry was chuffed when he was given custom All Blacks rugby jerseys for his niece and nephew – those can be added to the ever grown athletic collection for the tots.
Prince Charles often receives gifts on behalf of his grandchildren including a wooden rattle and kitted dress from Irish royalists for Princess Charlotte, who turns one in May.
When the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited Australia in 2014 some gifts for George included a cloak made from a possum’s pelt, a car sticker, a surfboard, a skateboard and a toothbrush – in case his parents forgot to pack one we guess?
Australia 2014: George accepts a gift of a stuff toy but throws it on the ground moments later.
According to palace protocol official gifts can be worn and used, but are not considered the royals' personal property. The royals do not pay tax on them.
When Prince Andrew and Princess Anne were gifted 100 mangos a piece from the former president of Pakistan Asif Ali Zardari they were entitled to eat their mangoes or alternatively perishable official gifts with a value less than £150 can also be given to charity or staff, if not used by the royals.
Royal gifts are recorded and cannot be sold or exchanged and eventually become part of the Royal Collection, which is held in trust by the Queen for her successors and the nation.
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