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The Block

"I don't see a lot of people like myself on TV": The Block's trans casting director calls for more diverse contestants to apply

''It's important to see yourself reflected in the media.''

By Alana Mazzoni
The casting director for The Block has revealed he is actively pushing for more diverse contestants to compete on next year's season.
Lucky Price, a proud trans man, is calling on marginalised Australians to put their hand up and apply for the show in 2022.
"It's something that has been at the forefront of my mind with all the casting I do, not just for The Block," he told TV Tonight.
"I'm a trans man and I say that just to exemplify my experience. I don't see a lot of people like myself on television."
The Block's casting director Lucky Price, a proud trans man, is calling on marginalised Australians to put their hand up and apply for the show in 2022. (Image: Nine)
Lucky said it's important for minority groups to be reflected in the media, adding that for him, it's personal.
He has been hand selecting applicants for the Channel Nine renovation show since 2010, and also works on casting for Travel Guides, Big Brother and Mastermind, but said he's yet to come across a trans man who has applied for The Block.
"The first and most important thing is I just want more people to put their hands up, if you don't see yourself on the television, you've got to put your hand up to be a part of it," he said.
The Block has been criticised in the past for its tendency to only cast young, white, straight contestants, but in recent years has featured a more diverse line-up of Aussies. (Image: Nine)
Lucky admitted the lack of diversity on Australian television is "incredibly frustrating," saying marginalised people don't feel welcomed.
"If you see don't see yourself on the television, you just don't think there's a place for you," he said.
The Block has been criticised in the past for its tendency to only cast young, white, straight contestants, but in recent years has featured a more diverse line-up of Aussies.
In 2003, executives made headlines for putting its first openly gay couple (Gav and Waz) on Aussies' television screens.
Lucky revealed that following the 2019 season, which featured Indigenous comedian Andy and his wife Deb, there has been an influx in First Nations people applying for the show. (Image: Nine)
Since then, more gay and lesbian couples, First Nations Australians, and Aussies with Asian and Lebanese backgrounds have been selected for the show.
Lucky revealed that following the 2019 season, which featured Indigenous comedian Andy and his wife Deb, there has been an influx in Aboriginal Aussies applying for the show.
"I think the television industry in Australia can be better. I think executives can be better. I think casting directors can be better. I think people in the community can be better at putting their hands up. Everyone bears a responsibility," he said.

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