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Married At First Sight

Filming Married At First Sight re-triggered Ines' PTSD

Despite her outward confidence, the legal assistant was suffering from anxiety.

Married at First Sight's Ines Basic came across as the no-holds-barred villain during her time on MAFS, but a friend claims the brutally honest bride wasn't coping at all. In fact, the experience was so intense it bought back her Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).
Not being able to leave her apartment or hotel room for hours on end reportedly triggered painful memories of the 28-year-old's traumatic childhood, where she was kept prisoner in refugee tents after she and her family fled Bosnia.
"She was suffering from chronic anxiety and was under so much stress she could barely move," the friend tells. "She would call me crying."
The source suggests Ines was crumbling from the pressures associated with her failed marriage to Bronson, hiding her affair with Sam and the intense demands of filming.
WATCH: Sam throws Ines under the bus by saying she made first contact. Post continues...
As a result, her anxiety became so bad she asked producers to hospitalise her. She even developed nerve damage in her right arm – a symptom of PTSD.
"Ines told me she'd wake up crying and screaming because she felt like she wasn't in her body," the friend explains.
"Producers put her on the phone to a psychologist who told her, 'You're having PTSD symptoms' and they put her straight into therapy."
Ines asked producers to hospitalise her because her anxiety was so bad during filming. (Image: Channel Nine)
Woman's Day previously reported that Ines had cut herself off from the rest of the cast and her closest friends, and is living like a recluse in her Brisbane home.
"She's lost about 12kg since filming finished – and she was tiny to begin with," revealed a source. "Everyone's really worried about her."
An Endemol Shine spokesperson said, "The health and safety of our participants is always our first priority. Psychological support is readily available."
Readers who are seeking assistance can call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or beyondblue on 1300 224 636.

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