Expert Advice

REAL LIFE: My baby's eczema was cured with a $10 moisturiser

A mother's heartbreak over her son's "painful and itchy" skin condition.

By Fiona Wright
Jaime Shields tried a range of eczema treatments for her son, until she finally found a range of products that completely cleared up her baby's skin:
My son, Carter had dry skin from birth but his eczema started when he was one years old. He was diagnosed with discoid eczema (a common type of eczema or dermatitis with coin-shaped areas of inflammation on the limbs or torso).
It became really bad when he was about 18 months old. His attitude changed and he would be so upset. It was painful and itchy.
My partner and I would both have to put his cream and ointment on him, as he would be screaming in pain. I'd cry as nothing would help but I was doing everything the doctors told me to do.
One in five children will develop eczema before the age of two. (Image supplied.)
We saw so many doctors who all told me to try different creams and steroid ointments. We did everything we were told to do - wet wraps, bleach and salt baths, steroid creams, antibiotics, different moisturisers - some treatments worked for a week, others not at all.
We went to the hospital only once when it got really infected.
I read an article about Childs Farm products. I started using the moisturiser and then we began using the bubble bath and shampoo.
Within a week I noticed a difference but it took about a month to clear up his skin. We now have our happy boy back and I couldn't be happier to finally find the right product."
Help treat eczema by keeping skin moisturised. (Image supplied.)

All about eczema

An estimated one in five children will develop eczema before the age of two, according to the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy.
The good news is that infantile eczema, which appears in the first six months of life, often improves between the ages of two and five.
The skin barrier of those who suffer from eczema is impaired, and has less water-retaining properties, so moisture is lost from the skin, causing it to dry out.
If your baby has eczema, she will have noticeably dry and itchy patches of red skin, usually in the folds of the arms and legs, or around the mouth and nappy region, as well as other areas of skin.
(Continues after video)

What can you do

Make sure you always keep your baby's skin well moisturised, dress in light, breathable clothing and place mittens over her hands to prevent scratching and bathe her daily, gently patting her skin dry.
If you suspect your baby has eczema, see your doctor for strategies to manage this skin condition. Eczema can easily become infected, especially if your bub scratches to relieve the itch, so visit your GP if you are at all concerned.
The Childs Farm range of products are available from Big W. (Image supplied.)