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Local News

Tiny holes in t-shirts; The mystery revealed

Is it moths? Is it your counter tops? Is it your cat? Nope. The problem is right under your belly button.

By Danielle Colley
There is a universally perplexing wardrobe mystery occurring in countries across the world. This issue has divided people for years as to the source of the problem.
The issue I'm referring to is the mysterious little holes that appear in every single tee shirt you own.
It is a proven fact (minor research done with a core group of my friends) that the more you love the tee shirt, the more likely it is to have a crop of the infuriating belly holes spring forth.
For years I thought I was alone in this strange phenomenon but I was comforted to discover that this wardrobe scourge is widespread and equally frustrating across the globe. Possibly the Universe.
You may not think this topic is hard hitting news, but when you've replaced you favourite tee twice, only to have it occur again it is certainly worthy of deep investigation.
A quick survey on my Facebook page suggested many people thought it was all about the cross body handbag, but then other sufferers of this professed to carrying backpacks, or shoulder bags. Myth busted.
Other people swear it's moths, but are moths really that OCD that they all only want to eat that one little delectable spot that possibly smells deliciously of belly button pheromones?
People suggested their washing machines were too rough, again OCD white goods are a believable option, or perhaps their cat was doing something jerky all over their tees whilst it sat in an unloved heap on the floor.

When I googled "why do my tee shirts…"

"Why do my tee shirts get holes at the bottom" comes up third on the list. This is a real problem.
Google says so.
The people in the internet worry that they are too fat, or the quality of their tees is too crap, but the explanation that all roads keep coming back to is this –
It's your jeans. Your jeans button to be precise.
Your seatbelt, your handbag, your counter tops, all cause friction between your tee and your button. That seemingly benign fastening device that holds your pants up on the bottom is destroying everything you love on the top.

An expert weighs in on the tiny holes

Bayard Winthrop, the founder and CEO of American Giant, an American-made basics brand spoke to Today shedding a least a little more light on the issue.
"That part of the shirt is a primary abrasion point," he said. "The fabric there is (rubbing) against the hardware: your belt, the tops of your jeans, all points of wear. The friction, repeated over time, has caused the fabric to deteriorate."
And the root cause?
"The real culprit here is often the T-shirt fabric itself. The garment itself might be produced as cheaply as possible, cutting costs where possible. Bummer, right?"
You've got that right...

The solution?

You could wear safety aprons all year round, or you could iron on a precautionary safety patch to all of your favourite tops.
Another option is looking out for better quality fabrics and materials when buying a shirt, look for high quality cotton like broadcloth, bamboo or Supima.
Alternatively you could embrace the hole and take comfort in the fact that you are not alone, and the mystery has been revealed.

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