Body

What Fiona Falkiner learnt from The Biggest Loser

The Biggest Loser alum brings us up to speed on the things she’s now grateful for, and why she loves her (gorgeous!) curves.

By Kate Minogue
What Fiona Falkiner learnt from The Biggest Loser

She was undoubtedly one of the most-loved contestants when she graced the body-transformation show in its debut season in 2006. Now, more than a decade later, Fiona Falkiner is happier than ever, coming full circle to host the latest batch of hopefuls.

Talking to us, Fiona, who recently stood up for 78kg contestant Nikki after an influx of social media backlash, reflects on her own TBL journey, recalling how she learnt to fight through the pain on the path to self-love.

Fiona's own TBL experience

On the first day of the show, they wanted us to jog around the house. I started hyperventilating and had a panic attack because I found it so difficult. But with every day, I got fitter. I could see after a week how much I’d improved and that inspired me to keep going.

I learned how to push through those mental barriers you get when you’re training – there are times when you think you can’t do anymore but when you push through, that’s when you start getting fit. I will always value that.

Her new approach to food

I used to eat three meals a day, but by the time I got to dinner I’d be starving. I find having mid-meal snacks is useful because by the time dinner comes around I don’t over eat.

I look at food now as a way to nourish me and keep me strong. I’ve cut out processed foods and I try to make everything from scratch.

Before and after: In 2006, Fiona went from a size 20 to 12 on The Biggest Loser.
Before and after: In 2006, Fiona went from a size 20 to 12 on The Biggest Loser.

Her go-to workouts, post-show

I usually train five times a week doing high-intensity interval training or spin, and do a yoga class and a walk with friends on the weekends. In the past, I used to focus on cardio, but now I’m doing regular exercise but it’s also really important for my mental wellbeing.

Her definition of self-love

I respect and value my body, and I try to treat it kindly because I want it to last for a long time. I use positive affirmations every day; they are like my form of meditation.

I sit and take some time to reinforce all the positive things about myself and pat myself on the back for everything I’ve achieved, and I try to be grateful for all the good things I have in my life.

Everything we do is a habit. If you start telling yourself you are healthy, happy and beautiful, and you repeat it often enough, that becomes a habit – and incredible things will happen!

read more from