Body

Gwyneth Paltrow is all about spruiking your 'leanest livable weight' and the internet aren't having it

What's in a name? In this case, EVERYTHING.

By Ellie McDonald

First she blew the world's minds with the concept of conscious uncoupling, next she had us cringing over her eight-day goat's milk cleanse

But just when it seems that sex dust and at-home enemas would be enough for the now-retired actress, she's now dabbling in the world of weightloss - and rubbing people up the wrong way in the process.

In a goop post aboout busting diet myths, Gwynnie and co. call on a phrase called leanest livable weight - something she, along with Dr Traci Mann, advocate for.

When you read the article, this concept of being your leanest livable weight is actually pretty reasonable (it stresses the importance of realising that all of us have a set weight range and we shouldn't diet ourselves stupid in order to weigh less than what is genetically good for us)

"For many of us, our leanest livable weight is heavier than our dream weight," Dr Mann writes. "I urge people to aim for their leanest livable weight, rather than below it. Embrace it—it's where your body wants you to be, it's easy to maintain, and you can be healthy there."

Y'see, Twitter don't seem to be blowing up about what this concept is all about but more the name of the concept itself, citing it as "harmful" and "dangerous" and suggesting that it also insinuates a school of thought surrounding "how to be as thin as possible without dying."

Look, we don't really know if the goop team care that they're being slammed again - they just keep releasing more and more products and concepts that leave the internet and health community divided.

OK, for argument's sake, let's rewind a couple of months: As part of her latest goop-spruiked "detox" you'll find the Implant O-Rama System At-Home Enema kit - a product that goop-approved Dr Junger says is made for those who know what they're poo - ahem - doing...

Naturally, the internet blew up. Exhibit A (a tweet from a professor in health law and science policy - AKA a health bigwig, who knows what he's talking about...)

And our own expert, Dr Dasha Fielder of Sapphire Family Medical Practice in Bondi Junction, agrees.

"I am not aware of any benefit of coffee enemas - there's certainly no research or evidence about it," she says.

"In general, enemas are used for cleansing of the large intestine - they can be helpful in people who suffer with chronic constipation or simply want a bowel cleanse."

"However, they certainly should not be done regularly. The best way to achieve good bowel habit is through correct nutrition with plenty of fiber and water and good life style with regular exercise."

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^^ Soz, GP.

This comes a little less than a year after Gwynnie, goop et al. attempted to defend their brand's holistic approach to health and wellness - and got proverbially burnt to a crisp because of it.

"We consistently find ourselves to be of interest to many — and for that, we are grateful — but we also find that there are third parties who critique goop to leverage that interest and bring attention to themselves," goop stated.

"Encouraging discussion of new ideas is certainly one of our goals, but indiscriminate attacks that question the motivation and integrity of the doctors who contribute to the site is not."

Well, what followed was a barrage of Twitter fury, directed at the star and her lifestyle ethos:

This isn't the first time something Gwyneth and her goop cohorts have said that has had the internet scratching their heads.

Just last year, during a Slack conversation about LA restaurants to frequent, one of Gwyn's goop staffers suggested she try the barbecued octopus at Cliff's Edge.

And so began another internet-making conversation on another goopy/kooky level...

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"Octopus are too smart to be food," she wrote. "They have more neurons in their brains than we do. I had to stop eating them because I was so freaked out by it."

"They can escape from sea world and shit by unscrewing drains and going out to sea. #tangent."

Inedible tentacles aside, what else has Gwynnie done to uphold a) her looks b) her health and c) her unintentional hilarity? Read on.

She steams her vagina

Gwynnie has been known to advocate this down-there treatment, even though it's been slammed by experts for its potential to burn and upset your vagina's internal bacteria.

"You sit on what is essentially a mini throne, and a combination of infrared and mugwort steam cleanses your uterus, et al. It is an energetic release – not just a steam douche - that balances female hormone levels," she wrote on her website.

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She also inserts crystals into her ladybits as a means of vaginal weightlifting

Alternative-health devotee Gwynnie featured the benefits of jade eggs for your sexual and reproductive systems on her website goop.

She also included a link to the shop on her site to purchase them…

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She lets bees sting her face in the name of beauty

Much braver than us, Gwyn is a fan of an ancient anti-inflammatory method called apitherapy: the practice of bees literally stinging your face.

"Generally, I'm open to anything," she says. "I've been stung by bees. People use it to get rid of inflammation and scarring."

"It's actually pretty incredible if you research it. But, man, it's painful."

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She eats “sex dust” for breakfast

Yes, sex dust.

Sex dust is apparently "a lusty edible formula alchemized to ignite and excite your sexy energy in and out of the bedroom," according to Moon Juice, the supplement brand that sells it.

And this is what Gwynnie adds to your morning smoothie every morning – whether she's cleansing on goat's milk or not.

Of her bizarre smoothies concoction, she says to add: "1 teaspoon moon dust of choice: Action Dust to soothe overworked muscles, Beauty Dust for a glowy complexion and healthy hair, Brain Dust to combat mental fogginess, Goodnight Dust when sleep has been evasive, Sex Dust, for, you know, and Spirit Dust to get that extrasensory perception going."

Err, we'll pass, thanks...

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