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Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway shake off Oscars envelopegate saga

The duo at the centre of envelopegate have brushed off the spectacular blunder that will go down in Oscars history... for all the wrong reasons.

By Candice Mehta-Culjak
While making a surprise appearance at the Governors Ball, the official afterparty of the Academy Awards, Warren Beatty, 79, and Faye Dunaway, 76, took the opportunity to explain that they were not to blame for Best Picture controversy at this year's Academy Awards.
“It wasn’t us,” Warren told Faye at the exclusive event in the early hours of February 27, when she asked if they were “in the sink.”
“People thought I was being dramatic but I wasn’t,” Warren explained while speaking with the Daily Mail.
“There was something wrong. I showed it to Faye and she said La La Land.”
Faye and Warren were on a mission to set the story straight. (Image via H. Walker/REX/Shutterstock).
Faye and Warren starred alongside each other in the iconic film Bonnie And Clyde. (Image via H. Walker/REX/Shutterstock).
Poor Warren was the unlucky presenter who was somehow handed the wrong envelope to read out.
In case you missed it, Warren, who was tasked with presenting the award for Best Picture alongside Faye, was mistakenly handed the envelope for the Best Actress award – which had already been announced and presented to Emma Stone for La La Land.
As he hesitated, failing the understand the words before him, Warren passed the card over to his co-presenter who, seeing only La La Land printed on the card, proclaimed it the winner.
The production team of La La Land were well into their acceptance speech for Best Picture, as it was revealed the WRONG winner had been announced.
A clearly rattled Warren tried to explain himself: "I want to tell you what happened. I opened the envelope and it said Emma Stone, La La Land. That's why I took such long look at Faye and at you."
Yikes!
WATCH: The awkward blunder happened live on television. Post continues after video...
The Daily Mail report that Warren was overheard backstage after the blunder, describing the brush as “one of the strangest things that's ever happened” to him.
They add that at this point a security guard attempted to recover the envelope from the veteran actor to which he responded, “Security is not getting this. I'm giving it to (Moonlight director) Barry Jenkins at a later time.”
Warren attended the after-party confidently, despite reports that his wife Annette Bening called to instruct the actor to go home. Explaining that he wanted to attend the ball as he'd done nothing wrong, Warren stayed at the event - with the controversial envelope clutched tightly in hand.
It's reported that Warren wouldn't allow anyone to see the controversial envelope.
PwC, formerly Pricewaterhousecoopers, the official accounting firm tasked with calculating the nominations and votes for the 2017 Oscars, released a statement in the wake of the Best Picture controversy.
"We sincerely apologise to Moonlight, La La Land, Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway, and Oscar viewers for the error that was made during the award announcement for Best Picture," the statement, which was shared on their official Twitter account, began.
"The presenters had mistakenly been given the wrong category envelope and when discovered, was immediately corrected. We are currently investigating how this could have happened, and deeply regret that this occurred. We appreciate the grace with which the nominees, the Academy, ABC, and Jimmy Kimmel handled the situation," it concluded.
Emma Stone also weighed in on the blunder, explaining, "I think we all would have loved to win Best Picture, but we are so happy for Moonlight, one of the best films all time."
"I was pretty beside myself. But I was also holding my Best Actress in a Leading Role card the entire time."
"So whatever the story, I don't mean to start stuff," she said to a stunned press room.
It’s thought that Warren was mistakenly handed a duplicate of the same card Emma graciously accepted earlier in the evening.
Moonlight's director Barry Jenkins took a dignified approach to the results.
"I think all the movies nominated were worthy," he told the media.
"I accepted the results and I applauded with everyone else. I noticed the commotion that was happening and I thought something strange had occurred. I'm sure you saw my face when the results."
"I've watched the Academy Awards before and have never seen that happen. It made a very special feeling even more special, but not in the way I expected!”

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