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The dress goes viral again in powerful domestic violence campaign

The Salvation Army have used the white and gold in a powerful social media campaign raising awareness for domestic violence victims.

Salvation Army ad campaign

Why is it so hard to see black and blue?

The Salvation Army have weighed in on the dressgate debate, and this is the question they are asking.

In a powerful ad campaign addressing violence against women, The Salvos have posted a confronting image of a woman wearing a white and gold dress with a black eye, bruises, and a busted lip.

She lays next to the headline “Why is it so hard to see black and blue”.

“The only illusion is if you think it was her choice. One in 6 women are victims of abuse. Stop abuse against women,” the ad states further, underneath the headline.

The Salvation Army ad campaign
The Salvation Army ad campaign

The ad which has turned the dress that almost broke the internet into another social media phenomenon- this time for a social cause- reached over 16 million people within hours, according to Salvation Army International.

The Salvation Army in South Africa who ran the ad campaign first posted the image on Friday, with almost eight thousand retweets alone.

In a second part to the ad campaign, an image of a woman covering her bruised lip and cheek with makeup stands next to the headline, “Because they cover it with white and gold”.

“The majority of women who are abused never report it. If you are in need of, or know someone who needs help, contact us on 011 718 6745,” the ad further states.

 The second part of The Salvation Army's ad campaign raising awareness around domestic violence
The second part of The Salvation Army's ad campaign raising awareness around domestic violence

The ad campaign reveals the harsh reality for many women worldwide in the lead up to International Women’s Day.

South African creative agency Ireland/Davenport produced the ad for the Salvation Army as a charity piece.

“We wanted to take advantage of the hype of the meme to spread awareness for something important,” Wihan Meerhloz, creative director of Ireland/Davenport told ABC News on Friday.

“We thought of the idea, produced it and offered it completely free to the Salvation Army in less that 24 hours,” he said.

“We hope it takes off on the Internet like the original dress did.”

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